The Knobstone Trail, part two. The hike, day 4.

Part two
The hike

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Day 4
Saturday, 10/10/15
5.5 miles

I awoke in the middle of the night to a pack of coyotes yipping and howling not too far from me – but just far enough that I wasn’t concerned. It was very a cool thing to listen to. Ahhh, nature. And then someone’s dog started to bark in reply. And another. Soon after they quieted down I was back asleep. This went on throughout the night. At midnight I woke up, enjoying the late-night wildlife serenade once again, but this time I wasn’t able to fall back asleep. I actually contemplated getting up and making a small campfire just for something to do. I think I finally fell back asleep around 2am. I woke up feeling rested, though. I think I get my best sleep on the trail. And as it turns out, even alone in the tent. I wasn’t freaked out at all any of the nights I was out there. This makes me so happy. Or maybe I’m just so tired by the time I get to camp that it doesn’t matter what’s going on outside my tent. It’s a strategy that works if you’re afraid of the creatures of the night!

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For breakfast I had the same oatmeal sludge as the past two mornings. About halfway in I started to struggle with it. I used to eat oatmeal every single morning for years when I worked in the office, and I loved it. I looked forward to it every day. Then I hiked the PCT in 2013 and towards the end I just couldn’t stomach the stuff no matter what I added to it. Even chocolate didn’t work! It was a sad day when I realized I just couldn’t eat oatmeal anymore. But since then, I’ve had it here and there and it’s been pretty good. I guess it’s good until day three. This trip confirmed that two days in a row is my new oatmeal limit. I finished it, but it was tough. I needed the energy for my last stretch, and I was just about out of food. I guess I planned well! All I had left were a couple of true lemon flavor packets, two honey packets, a piece of fruit leather, and my emergency Ramen. Perfecto.

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Oatmeal sludge a third morning in a row. Blecht. So sad.

The first few miles were flat, wide trail, and I actually made good time for once! The trail was too wide for spiders and their webs, so that helps! The sun was shining, the tree’s leaves were turned all kinds of vibrant yellows, oranges and reds, and the sky popped through in its vivid, lively blue. It was a perfect day.

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Wide, pretty, nearly spider-free trail. For just a few glorious miles.

Just a couple of miles from the end, I popped out on the shore of Spurgeon Hollow Lake. I stood in awe for a few moments just taking it in. First of all, it was water on an otherwise super-dry trail. I didn’t need any to drink, but it almost felt like my skin was soaking in the moisture. It was nice to see. The water was like a mirror, reflecting a rainbow of fall foliage and was covered in a thin layer of fog rolling across it’s surface. It was the perfect scene to finish up my autumn backpacking trip on the Knobstone Trail.

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Spurgeon Hollow Lake.

I arrived at the trailhead at 9:50am, just as Adam was pulling up in the jeep. He scooped me up, brought me to a mint chocolate chip ice cream cone followed by lunch. I was craving fish. So weird. Not a burger, not a steak, not even a beer! I got a brewed decaf coffee and a delicious swordfish steak with steamed broccoli and some french fries. Post-hike meals. Yep. Maybe the real reason I love to hike is because… well, food.

A couple more from the last day:

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Another shot of Spurgeon Hollow Lake.

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One last look up through the golden treetops. It doesn't take money to be rich.

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Delaney Lake, at the northern end of the Knobstone Trail.

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Another boring, ugly shot of the trail and that annoying bright sun. ;)

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And later in the evening, when I felt like drinking a beer? I got this nut brown. And yes, I bought it partly because of the design. It was really good, too!

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Happy Toots! Now if only I could keep hiking! Forever!


Tonight I love the Knobstone Trail. Minus the spiders in the trail.

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)

The Knobstone Trail, part two. The hike, day 3.

Part two
The hike

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One of the things I love most about the midwest is the forests. Especially in the fall.

Day 3
Friday, 10/9/15
15 miles

I woke up at 5:30am to the pitch black and started my day. I was feeling great! It was really windy, so I had to be careful taking my tent down so it didn’t blow off the knob I was camped on. For breakfast I made the same oatmeal sludge as the day before, and it was still pretty good. I guess. The hot decaf coffee felt like a treat.

Since I was up so early, I was ready to hike while it was still dark, but I wasn’t really comfortable with that, knowing how tough the trail can be to find at times, so I sat on a log and waited about 10 minutes. By then it was just getting light and I was able to navigate fine with my headlamp. I was hiking by 7:15am.

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Gigantic tree goiter

There weren’t as many spiders in the morning, and I quietly celebrated to myself. It was a good thing, too, because the hills were crazy for the first half of the day. Some were so steep I could’ve glissaded down on my butt if I didn’t mind a little gravel-rash. I chose to just hike it. I thought about coming back in the winter with a sled, though! Oh, and I missed a turn, hiked up a huge hill for a quarter mile, then realized my mistake and hiked back down. Oh, you silly knobstone trail!

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A double blaze. These indicate a sharp turn in the trail or sometimes just a tricky junction. Keep your eyes peeled!

When I got close to Elk Creek Lake, I started fantasizing about it. “I know there’s a boat landing. Maybe there’s a beach. Maybe I can yogi a cold soda off of a fisherman. Ooh, I’m going to make beef stroganoff for lunch! And drink cold coffee! And swim. I hope there’s a beach.”

Just like many forested backpacking lakes in the midwest, it was green, silty, and mostly made for fishing. And there was a boat ramp, but no beach. And no people. I sat in the grass along the edge of the parking lot and made my stroganoff and cold coffee while I waited for my green, silty water treatment to do its thing. Then I stepped into the cold water up to my knees, washed off my filthy, awesome hiker legs and let my eyes roll back in my head from the natural healing affect of cold water on tired feet. What a total morale booster!

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Breaktime pack explosion at Elk Creek Lake.

Just before I left, a DNR truck pulled up to the boat ramp and dumped a tank full of what I assumed were little minnows of some sort. Thankfully I got my water before that. Or had they been there once already that morning? They could’ve been. That water tasted so dirty… I mean like actual dirt, and had a bit of a gritty texture. I don’t know why, but it still surprises me when a stagnant puddle of water tastes better than water from a big lake. I added about three flavor packets and topped it off with an Emergen-C. That’ll fix it, right?

When I arrived at the Oxley memorial trailhead, I was anticipating a road walk of about 2 miles due to timber harvesting, but when I arrived, the pink ribbons and detour signs were all taken down! Great! And in a mile I had my second jug of drinking water that I’d cached. I dumped out my Elk Creek Lake water and refilled my bladder and bottles with the good stuff. Then I moved on.

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An undisturbed water cache. Thankful for the clear, delicious water!

And then I got tired. Man, I was pooped! I took a break and just rested my bones. I ate a Pro-bar and threw a few jelly beans into my mouth, and I could almost feel the sugar coursing through my veins. Yes! Let’s hike!

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This is a "I'm tired and stopping right here in the middle of the trail" kind of break.

A few miles from camp, I was stopped by another spider web. Only bigger. And the spider was different, too. He was quarter-sized. His large, globular butt was bright yellow with black specks and his legs and the rest of his body a bright orange. He was kind of pretty, but those creepy legs! I did not want them on me. I saw one other just like this another mile down the trail, but that was it. Thankfully. The good thing about these being so big and bright, I usually could see them coming, at least. Unlike the other more camouflage guys. Blecht.

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A new variety of spider. Mr. Orange.

I passed up a small campsite under some tall Pines because it was low and felt damp and creepy. I’m glad I did, because I climbed yet another steep hill and found a cute little site at the top, just before a dirt road crossing.

I got set up and put on my nanopuff jacket. My sweat wasn’t totally dry and the temperature had dropped just enough to give me a bit of a chill. Hot decaf was again a really nice treat. Dinner was loaded mashed potatoes with a bacon Epic bar (so delicious!) chopped up in it. I threw in some cheddar cheese, Frank’s hot sauce and threw more potatoes on there in the form of my crushed-up chips. That was the last of ’em. Best trail food ever. We’ll, it’s all good. Most of it. For dessert I had three pieces of Dove dark chocolate with almond butter. So good!

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Camp, night three.

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Mashed potatoes before I dressed them up with meat and cheese.

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Apparently I thought dessert deserved a photo.

I was in bed early again, glad to be resting and reflecting on my journey so far. I only had 5.5 miles to go in the morning. I was excited to see Adam, but fantasized that he’d pick me and take me to eat a big dinner, get some ice cream, sleep in a bed, then I’d resupply my food bag, he’d drop me back off on the trail, and I’d keep on hiking.

It doesn’t matter how long a hike is… It’s never long enough.

A few more photos from the day:

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Morning map reading and journal jotting.

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Makes kind of a cool photo, but also makes me kinda sad. So unnecessary.

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Check out this dude's eyes! So cool!

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Spider check after a big climb. So sweaty, too!

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So many camo critters on this trail!

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A leafy rainbow. Never gets old.

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Stickbug love. I haven't seen a stickbug since I was a kid. Neato!

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I'm really no good at the duck lips, and it's not my kinda thing, anyway... but this tree sure has it down!


Tonight I love food. Especially during a hike.

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)

The Knobstone Trail, part two. The hike, day 2.

Part two
The hike

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Too late for most wildflowers, but these little asters were still hanging around.

Day 2
Thursday, 10/8/15
14 miles

I woke up in the dark and crawled out of my tent with my headlamp illuminated, and found a spot to squat for a pee. While I relieved my full bladder, I spotted a really pretty purple-blue, sparkling dew drop on a tree. Or so I thought. After I was done with my pee I walked over and took a closer look. It wasn’t a dew drop. Know what it was? A giant, hairy spider. The “dew drop” was his glowing eyeball! And he was devouring a daddy long leg spider as the poor thing’s long legs twitched around him. I stared, disgusted. His freakin eyes glowed! Like a deer! Like a large, furry mammal! And you know what’s terrifying? When I slowly turned my head and scanned the forest floor with my headlamp, these special little “dew drops” were everywhere! Hundreds. Don’t get me wrong, I really don’t mind spiders – as long as they aren’t on me. In fact, as long as I can safely observe them off of my body, I’m quite intrigued by them. But this new discovery, in addition to the little greasy brown and white guys that lived in the middle of the trail, I was feeling pretty crawly. Too many. Too many spiders!

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One of the big furry guys with the glowing eyeballs. Eek!

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These were the most common spiders I saw. These were the ones I was constantly running into on the trail and having to pick off of me.

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In fact, selfies had a new purpose. Spider check. Here there's one tucked into my braid.

I took down my tent and found a spot that was spider-free to sit and make my breakfast. I mixed a hearty oatmeal with granola, Nido instant whole milk, peanut butter protein powder, hemp seed, flax and cinnamon. It was really good! Maybe I loved oatmeal again! Maybe…

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Cranked up oatmeal. Yum! I think!

At 7:30am it was light enough out that I could turn off my headlamp and get ready to hike. I reached into my pack for my toothbrush and went to brush my teeth. When I returned, I realized I stupidly leaned my pack on my hydration bladder’s mouthpiece, draining the last of my water into my hip belt padding and the leaves below. Awwww, shoot. I had 6 miles to hike these crazy hills with no water. This was when I decided I’m over the bladder thing. Bottles for this girl. Not only did the thing have a slow leak, apparently there’s too much room for user error, too. At least for me. What a demoralizing way to start my day!

Thankfully about a mile into my hike I found a small, clear pool of water to treat. I was surprised how good it tasted, considering it was a calm pool with its floor covered in leaves. What a life-saver! Thanks for providing, trail!

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Clear and floaty-free! From a puddle!

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I mixed up my new favorite drink, too. Plain old chia seeds in water. So plain, but so yum!

At 2pm I stopped to take my shoes off to give my feet a little air and was really happy with how well they were doing in my new Altras. No blisters, although to be fair, I don’t blister that often… You know, because my feet were made for this! Obviously. Hah! I did have some foot fatigue, though, and that actually comforts me. I love that my feet get sore from hiking lots of miles. It reminds me that I’m alive and all that good, deep, sappy stuff. But really… I learned from my two long walks that there is comfort in the discomfort of backpacking, and as much as it can suck at times, I really do love it.

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I love these feet so much. They are good to me, considering what I put them through!

I had tuna with mayo and cheese again for lunch, and I really enjoyed the break – from the stupid spiders, mostly. They were making me crazy-mad just before I stopped. I mean, I was actually getting grumpy! I felt so much better after eating and resting, though, that I chalked the grumpies up to just needing food and rest. There were still spiders the rest of the day, but I was dealing with them with much more patience. Oh, and I stopped for a poo. That might have helped, too.

I found my perfect little campsite – furry spiders and all – on a tall, breezy knob at 5:30. Once the sun went down, the stars came out and it cooled off. I made a mexican rice dinner with Sriracha and Taco sauce, cojack cheese, and potato chips, of course. It was pretty delicious. I did wish I had my tortillas for this one, but it was good out of a bowl, too.

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Camp, night two.

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Dinner. Mexican rice, taco sauce, and cheese. Nom!

I was in my tent at 7:15, feeling content laying horizontal in the dark, listening to the wind through the tall oak trees above me. It was a recipe for a great night’s sleep. And it was.

A few more photos from the day:

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This was one of two abandoned campsites I saw along the trail. They did know tents aren't disposable one-time use items... Right? So weird.

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Just a pretty, leafy trail.

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Drying sweaty clothes. A nightly ritual.

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Chillaxin' time!

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Weirdest bug ever!

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One of several large river beds you cross on the Knobstone Trail. Bone dry. All of them!

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Spot the critter!

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There were quite a few spots that could've used a little maintenance. Blowdowns can be tough to get over or under.

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The most adorable little mushrooms ever!


Tonight I love my feet. Because they’re awesome and so tough!

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)

The Knobstone Trail, part two. The hike, day 1.

Part two
The hike

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The start of the trail, take one.

Day 1
Wednesday, 10/7/15
11 miles

It started with a wrong turn. What a great way to start. Each new trail I hike usually takes a bit to get the hang of. How are the blazes spaced, how well-maintained is the route, how often does it turn sharply, and where would it most-likely go if it’s not well-marked? I sure got a good feel for the trail after the first two miles, because I went the wrong way. You sure learn a lot going the wrong way! The trailhead at the start is a temporary trailhead that looks quite permanent. The trail starts by following a horse trail for a little bit, and there’s a warning sign at the trailhead that reads, “KT not well-marked. Be careful.”

So when I started out from Wilson Switch Road, I kept my eyes open, looking for the white trail blazes. When I saw one, I veered off and started following the overgrown trail. I assumed this is what the sign meant. It was marked, but so hard to follow! So I trudged on. I had to hike blaze to blaze for an hour, sometimes walking a few different directions looking for the next blaze. When I came out to a road, surprised to already be at my first road crossing, I turned airplane mode off on my phone and Google maps showed me on Wilson Switch Road – the same road where I started – only I was .6 miles down the road from the temporary trailhead and the nice sign saying to be careful. I guess I was at the original trailhead, which is no longer used, and this explains the horribly unmaintained trail and old, faded blazes. Duh! So I laughed at myself and started walking down the road back to the new trailhead to start over. I’m happy to say I got it right the the second time around! I just hadn’t gone far enough. The trail was still kind of hard to spot, but I made sure it was heading north the second time around.

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The start of the trail, take two.

It was a cool morning with the sun shining through the colorful trees in beams. It was an absolutely gorgeous way to start out. It was looking like it was going to be a perfect autumn hike.

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One of my favorite photos from the hike and one of the first I took.

At noon I realized I forgot to pack my tortillas, so I spent some time as I walked thinking of creative ways to eat my tuna, peanut butter and rice that I packed to eat with them.

There had been a lot of huge spider webs spread across the trail at face-level right from the start, and every single one had a live spider in its center. I realized after a few hours that this was going to be a regular thing. And it was. This continued for the rest of the hike, and at times was very frustrating, even putting a little damper on the hike. I can handle a web here and a web there, but I was stopping every 15 seconds (literally) at times to frantically pull the web off of my face, out of my eyebrows, eyelashes and mouth – while looking for, finding, and brushing the poor newly homeless spider off of me. There were just. So. Many. Spiders. It was crazy. And there would be more at night when it got dark. But these were of a different variety, which I discovered the morning of day two.

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So. Many. Spiders.

At my lunch break I mixed my tuna and mayo in a ziplock container (because no tortilla), and it worked out just fine. I topped it with cheese and crushed potato chips. While I was finishing up my meal, a critter came wobbling down the trail towards me. I’m not sure what he was, but he was cute! He looked kind of like a marmot, but I’m pretty sure southern Indiana doesn’t have marmots! He stood on his hind legs all cute and prarie-dog-like (he was too big to be a prarie dog), and after about a one-minute stare-off, he slowly got back down on to all fours and waddled away. This felt like a bonus for being solo. Apparently I hadn’t started talking to myself out loud yet!

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Hiker-toughened briar-scratched legs.

With a sweat-soaked shirt and scratched legs from green briars that dominate the trail in places, I arrived at camp at 5:30 pm. It was a tiny little site on a high ridge, which I hoped would keep the nightly condensation down, which it did. The valleys I hiked down into throughout the day felt damp and dark, so I was happy to be perched up on top of a bright, airy ridge for my first night.

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Camp on night one. Complete with sweaty clothes hanging to dry.

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Mmmm, Mac-n-cheese dinner! It was the heaviest, so it went first.

Dinner was mac-n-cheese with Sriracha sauce, cheese and potato chips. When else can you eat mac-n-cheese guilt-free, and topped with chips? I really love backpacking!

More photos from day one:

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It's definitely autumn!

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I made a friend on the trail! I nearly stepped on him!

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Incredibly camouflage insect!

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That Hill doesn't look big, but it is! I dominated it.

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Ginormous!

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A different, larger variety of trail spider.

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Because I just posted a photo of a spider, here's a pretty butterfly.

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Makin' dinner in my cool tights.

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Cool KT trail marker.

Tonight I love Mac-n-cheese. I know it’s bad for me, but it’s such a delicious trail dinner!

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)

The Knobstone Trail, part one. The trail, the plan, the prep

Part one
The trail, the plan and the prep

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I can pretend it’s a thru hike. It’s just a wee little one, relatively speaking. The Knobstone Trail is 58 miles in total, but if hiked straight from one end to the other it’s 45.5 miles. The other 12.5 miles are part of two loops at the north end of the trail, making a figure-8 shape. The amazing thing about this trail is the elevation change. It’s a series of ups and downs – steep ups and downs – that add up to a whopping 11,000 feet in elevation gain. That is not a typo. Yeah, it’s southern Indiana, but don’t be deceived. There are some serious hills and bluffs. And they aren’t easy.

The Knobstone Trail has been called “The Little AT (Appalachian Trail)” due to its similarities with the long trail. The terrain, in particular. I imagine the forested scenery might have something to do with that, too, but I have yet to hike the AT, so my personal comparison will have to come later. I’ve read this trail is actually a great trainer for the AT, so when the time comes – and it will – I’ll give the Knobstone Trail another visit. Maybe I’ll yo-yo it! Man, that sounds awesome!

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That's one crazy elevation profile!

I started planning this trip months ago, and from the start, I wanted to accomplish a few specific things. First, I wanted to go alone. I enjoy social hiking with friends – a lot. But I really wanted to gain some more experience hiking solo so that I can really push myself. Or hold back. Or whatever I feel like doing at that moment. But mostly push. I really miss my long, crazy overnighters on the Ice Age Trail back home. I really enjoyed this solo experience, and I will most definitely be doing more of it.

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Water drop. Duct tape is to know it hasn't been tampered with by people or critters. And ETA written in marker so others know to leave it be. Oh, and yes - I carried the empties out. Please never leave empties or partially full jugs behind. Ugh. So many people did. It was sad to see.

Second, as you already know, I wanted to challenge myself. I was hoping for a tough trail, and the Knobstone delivered. It’s been said that it’s the toughest trail in the midwest. From the trails I’ve hiked around the midwest so far, I agree. The hills really are insanely steep up and down. Going up burns your quads and lungs, and going down stresses the feet, ankles and shins. Over and over and over again. I got so sweaty at times that my long-sleeved hiking shirt was soaked through entirely. These are the sort of things I love about backpacking, though. I came into camp each night exhausted with the biggest smile on my face!

And last, I wanted to hike the trail from one end to the other. Like a thru-hike. It’s short, but it’s all that I have time for these days. So it’s my own little mini thru-hike. I’ll take what I can get! I hiked the 45.5 miles starting on the south end at the Deam Lake Recreation area, ending at the Delaney Lake campground. The first day I hiked 11 trail miles, but 14 in total due to a funny misfire at the start, which I’ll mention in part two, about the hike. Day two I hiked 14 miles, day three totaled 15 miles, and the last day was a short, but gorgeous 5.5 miles to finish up the trip. I felt pretty happy with those miles, considering I hadn’t done a lot of hiking this summer, at all. Thank you, dear legs, feet and lungs. You rock.

Prep
To prep for this trip, I first bought the guide book and maps, and read. I made the decision to hike north, and where to drop two water caches. The Knobstone Trail crosses stream beds a billion times, but all are bone dry – at least this late in the season. There are four lakes. At the south end is Deam Lake, then 32 miles north is Elk Creek Lake, about 10 more miles north is Spurgeon Hollow Lake, and finally, Delaney Lake at the north end. There were a few mucky ponds along the route, but I wouldn’t drink from them unless I were desperate. And if I really wanted some muddy feet getting it. They looked pretty gnarly.

I have also been acquiring some updated gear over the past few months, and I was excited to try it all out. I had a new backpack (40-liter Gossamer Gear Gorilla), trail shoes (Altra Lone Peak 2.5), poo trowel (Deuce of Spades), skirt (Purple Rain  Skirt), sleeping bag (Western Mountaineering Ultralite 20° bag), and a new hydration bladder (Platypus Hoser 2L) that convinced me I’m probably done using bladders. Maybe on day hikes, but they are such a pain! In fact, I’ve already returned my new one – it had a small leak out of the box. Everything besides the bladder worked great! I hope to do a gear review entry going into more detail about these items soon.

The purpose of the new gear was to make an effort to lower my base weight, and I did. By about 5 pounds. With all my gear, 4 liters of water, and 3-1/2 days’ worth of food, my total weight was 31 pounds. I was pretty happy with that!

And I was so ready to hit the trail!

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Gear pile!

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Total weight with water and food! Not bad!


Tonight I love creative solutions. Our Jeep broke down when we got to the Deam Lake campground, so we had to bring it a shop the next morning and find a rental car. There were seriously no rental cars anywhere in the area (Louisville included!), so we ended up renting a U-haul van. Do what works!

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Our rental car!

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Eek! This guy was by the shower room at the campground. It was just a sign of things to come... Read part two!

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Our perfect little tent site at the Deam Lake campground.

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)

A documentary interview

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A chance to reminisce. It was a fun little walk! You know, just 4,600-or-so miles. :)

There’s this really cool guy, Mark Phillips, who walked across the country wearing a backpack, like my mom and I did. He made a few attempts before accomplishing his goal of hiking from New York to California, and he calls himself “The Walking Fool.” He’s been taking video footage of these journeys and the people he’s met along the way for a feature-length documentary. Pretty cool, hey!?

Well, I received an email from him asking if he could interview mom and me for his film. Any excuse for us to reminisce about our 2006 trip on the ADT and share our stories is a good excuse, but this one was definitely okay!

Mark and his camera guy, David, flew to Minneapolis from New York a couple of weekends ago, then made the backcountry driving trip to the boonies in Phillips where my parents live to meet up with us.

I didn’t feel nervous about this at all… That is until the morning Mark and David were going arrive. I had Adam make me a whiskey old fashioned to take the edge off. A little booze can do that, I suppose. It might not be the healthiest approach, but why the heck was I so nervous, anyway!? I’d been in front of cameras before! So, booze before 5pm? Eh, whatever, you can judge me. I don’t mind!

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Nerve-calming old fashioned.

Mark and David jumped right in, looking around for a good place to set up – something with good light and not much background noise. They first tried a back porch, but once the backdrop was set up, a healthy breeze whipped up, causing them to move indoors. The light coming through the window was a little back and forth with the sun hiding behind clouds every once in a while, but they also brought an extra light, so I hope it all turned out okay for them. There’s so many details to think about with this kind of stuff, and these guys had it covered.

Once the backdrop was set up, equipment was positioned, and our mics were strung under our shirts, we got rolling. Besides my pits sweating profusely and a little bit of tripping over my words at the start, everything went pretty well. I got on a roll talking like I tend to do, and then mom joined in and told her side of things, making us all tear up with her story about why she didn’t hesitate to go with me. After the basics of our story were covered we started with a few stories. Oh, do we have some stories. And it sounds like Mark and David enjoyed them, but oh, if only there were more time. We barely touched on them! There are SO many more! (I gotta get going on that book!)

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Mark and my dad help us with our mics.

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The interview under way!

So look for the trailer online. I’ll include some links to check out below, including the trailer. I don’t know a ton of details about the film yet, but the jist of the story is about Mark’s journey, and he interviewed a few other cross-country walkers, like mom and me, to be a little part of it – to maybe find a link into why we’re all so crazy.

It was a fun experience for sure. Once the cameras were off, the guys started breaking down their equipment while we chatted and shared more stories. My dad headed outside to grill his famous campfire steaks, and before we knew it we were all at the table eating those steaks. With baked potatoes and mom’s fresh-from-the-garden salad, too.

It all went by so fast, and soon Mark and David were off, back to Minneapolis to catch their early flight back to New York.

I can’t wait to see the film, and I wish Mark and his crew the best! This was such a cool experience and we were so honored to be a part of it. It’s gonna be great. I’ll keep you all updated when I hear of any news! Maybe we’ll become big-time celebrities! Haha!

Links:
Like “The Walking Fool” on Facebook.

View the trailer from the Indiegogo campaign.

Here’s another trailer, and some more info at the website walkingfool.com.

I think you’ll all appreciate his sense of humor. It’s kind of a requirement for a walk across America!


Tonight I love that adventure memories live and linger forever. Dreaming something? Do it. Now. So worth it.

Thanks for reading and being a part of my journey!

With love,
Toots Magoots
(Robin Grapa)